Apod picture of day nasa

apod picture of day nasa

Will APOD soon run out of pictures?

Q15: Wont APOD soon run out of pictures? A15: Probably not. NASA has archived literally hundreds of thousands of space and astronomy related pictures and APOD readers have come to submit many images for our consideration. So far, we have more good pictures than we can run.

Where can I find the latest NASA news?

NASA.gov brings you the latest images, videos and news from Americas space agency. Get the latest updates on NASA missions, watch NASA TV live, and learn about our quest to reveal the unknown and benefit all humankind.

How can I get a poster of a particular APOD?

Q7: How can I get a nice poster of a particular APOD? A7: APOD does not sell posters. We therefore suggest that you print out a copy for personal use, or use a search engine to locate a version for sale by a vendor.

What does APOD stand for?

A1: APOD stands for the Astronomy Picture of the Day. We abbreviate this as APOD instead of ApotD because APOD sounds better (spoken: AYE-pod). Q2: How can I easily see yesterdays APOD? A2: Click the < less than sign < at the left of todays APOD link line (near the bottom of the daily page). Q3: How can I see an APOD that ran long ago?

Are some APOD Pictures run more than once?

Q4: Have some APOD pictures been run more than once? A4: Yes. Many of our readers have been with us less than a year and are unaware of some really spectacular or important astronomy pictures. New information about old pictures is becoming available over the WWW.

Can I Use Your APOD images for my brochure?

Q9: Can I use your APOD images for my brochure? A9: Many APOD images are copyrighted and so to use them you must write to the copyright owners for explicit permission. Many times, these copyright owners can be found by following the links provided under the APOD image (s).

How can I see an APOD that ran long ago?

Q3: How can I see an APOD that ran long ago? A3: All APODs are archived. To see any past APOD, access the archive page. This is found by clicking archive on the link line, or even by clicking Discover the Cosmos near the top of recent APOD pages.

How often do you rerun apods?

In general, our rerun policy currently is to only rerun APODs more than one year old to keep the pictures relatively new to new APOD viewers. We will almost never rerun more than two pictures in any given week. So when you load the current APOD,it is still, most probably, a new picture.

The new system improves the capabilities of NASA JPL’s Center for Near Earth Object Studies to assess the impact risk of asteroids that can come close to our planet. . News . . Are Water Plumes Spraying From Europa?

Will you use my picture for an APOD?

Q5: I have a picture that would make a good APOD. Will you use it? A5: We cant promise to use it but we do strongly encourage picture submissions to APOD. Even if you only know of a good picture, please tell us about it. If you own the copyright for a submitted picture, please grant us explicit permission to use it.

How can I see an APOD that ran long ago?

Q3: How can I see an APOD that ran long ago? A3: All APODs are archived. To see any past APOD, access the archive page. This is found by clicking archive on the link line, or even by clicking Discover the Cosmos near the top of recent APOD pages.

How can I see a higher resolution version of a particular APOD?

Q7a: How can I see a higher-resolution version of a particular APOD? A7a: Clicking on the picture itself brings up the highest resolution version of the image available from APOD. It is possible that higher resolution versions exist. To find these you should follow the informative links in the APOD text.

What does APOD stand for?

A1: APOD stands for the Astronomy Picture of the Day. We abbreviate this as APOD instead of ApotD because APOD sounds better (spoken: AYE-pod). Q2: How can I easily see yesterdays APOD? A2: Click the < less than sign < at the left of todays APOD link line (near the bottom of the daily page). Q3: How can I see an APOD that ran long ago?

Q11: Is APOD available as a book? A11: Selections from APODs daily pages have been compiled into two books titled Universe: 365 Days (May 1, 2003) and Astronomy: 365 Days (October 1, 2006) - Publisher: Harry N Abrams.

Will APOD soon run out of pictures?

Q15: Wont APOD soon run out of pictures? A15: Probably not. NASA has archived literally hundreds of thousands of space and astronomy related pictures and APOD readers have come to submit many images for our consideration. So far, we have more good pictures than we can run.

Can I use APOD Pictures in my classroom?

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